Report | Environment Oregon

Skating on Thin Ice

Every four years, the world’s finest winter athletes gather for the top competition on snow and ice. But even as we celebrate competition and athleticism, global warming is undermining the climate conditions that make the Winter Olympics possible. Nine of the hottest years ever recorded on Earth have happened since 2000. Winter average temperatures across the contiguous United States have warmed more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit since 1970. The primary cause of this warming is human use of fossil fuels and we need to act now to prevent the worst from happening. Global warming is affecting Winter Olympic sports in multiple ways:

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Lighting The Way

Solar energy is on the rise. America has more than three times as much solar photovoltaic capacity today as in 2010, and more than 10 times as much as in 2007. In the first three months of 2013, solar power accounted for nearly half of the new electricity generating capacity in the United States. The price of solar energy is falling rapidly, and each year tens of thousands of additional Americans begin to reap the benefits of clean energy from the sun, generated right on the rooftops of their homes or places of business. America’s solar energy revolution has been led by 12 states that have used public policies to open the door for solar energy and are reaping the rewards as a result.  Oregon, however, missed the cut and ranks 13th in the nation for per capita solar installations.

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Wind Energy for a Cleaner America II

America’s wind power capacity has quadrupled in the last five years and wind energy now generates as much electricity as is used every year in Georgia. Thanks to wind energy, America uses less water for power plants and produces less climate-altering carbon pollution. In 2012, Oregon currently was 8th in the nation for wind energy production.

Report | Environment Oregon

Top Risks of Increased Logging in our Forests

Whether it is towering groves of old-growth or crystal clear rivers winding through tree-covered canyons, Oregon’s forests are really what make Oregon, Oregon. Under pressure from the timber industry, members of Congress want to cut a shortsighted, special deal to aggressively log over a million acres of our publicly owned forestland, called the O&C Lands. This would roll back critical environmental protections, such as the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act, in order to ramp up clear-cuts and destruction.

The scariest part of this new logging proposal is that very few Oregonians know the truth. The timber industry and their allies in Congress are calling this logging “balanced,” but the facts show that this is anything but true.

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

On the heels of Oregon’s largest and most devastating wildfires in over a decade a new report from Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center finds that even as Oregon works to cut carbon pollution and transition to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America. Scientists predict that extreme weather events will become more frequent and severe for future generations, unless we cut the dangerous carbon pollution fueling the problem. Environment Oregon was Angus Duncan, Chair of Oregon's Global Warming Commission; OSU Professor Andreas Schmittner; the Douglas County Global Warming Coalition; and Southern Oregon Climate Action Network for the release of the report.

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