Blog

As the fight to protect our oceans and wildlife from plastic pollution gains steam and bans on polystyrene and other unnecessary sources of plastic pollution become more widespread, it’s inspiring and refreshing to see so many young people take the lead on protecting our planet.

 | by
Celeste Meiffren-Swango
State Director, Environment Oregon

This summer, Environment Oregon has been talking to people across the greater Portland area about our “Charge Ahead, TriMet” campaign, calling on TriMet to accelerate the integration of electric buses into our transit fleets as a key strategy to achieve reductions in pollution from the transportation sector to protect public health and tackle climate change. We are excited to report that our "Bus Line Business Coalition for Electric Buses" just hit 100 businesses.

There are many reasons to be optimistic about a future powered by the sun and wind.

There is no reason to despoil a pristine wilderness for last century fuels.

How California’s new rule could revolutionize rooftop solar

States, cities, college campuses and businesses claim the mantle of climate leadership.

More than a decade after local and global activists curbed tropical deforestation in South America, more forests in Brazil and Bolivia are burning again. As the planet heats up, this loss should concern all of us -- and there’s something we can do about it, right here, right now.

Cities and towns of all sizes are driving the transition to solar energy.

 | by
Celeste Meiffren-Swango
State Director, Environment Oregon

We are calling on TriMet to ditch diesel and transition to an all electric bus fleet.

 | by
Celeste Meiffren-Swango
State Director, Environment Oregon

Starting next week, the Oregon legislature will be considering Senate Bill 1507 and House Bill 4001, collectively known as "Clean Energy Jobs." This is a great opportunity to take bold action on climate change-- and what better time? With so much at stake, and our window to stave off the worst impacts of climate change steadily closing, it's up to states like Oregon to take the lead.