Updates

We're backing legislation to restore protections to the heart of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

At the urging of lawmakers and our national network, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took a small step toward cleaning up our drinking water.

More than 10,000 Americans said "no" to plastic straws in February.

The debate over whether and when Americans will drive cars that pollute far less, or not at all, has intensified.

 | by
Celeste Meiffren-Swango
State Director, Environment Oregon

Environment Oregon supports House Bill 2618 because we believe Oregon should continue to incentivize rooftop solar across the state to achieve our climate goals, reduce energy costs for consumers, and increase the resiliency of the electrical grid.

 

On February 20th, a group of 45 city and state decision makers and clean energy advocates joined us for our webinar, “What a Solar Homes Policy Could do for Your Community.” Environment America’s Go Solar Campaign Director Bret Fanshaw summarized the findings of our recent report, Solar Homes: The Next Step for Clean Energy. Representatives from the California Solar and Storage Association and the City of South Miami, Florida, then spoke to their communities’ successes in making solar the default on new construction through statewide and municipal Solar Homes policies, respectively.

The scale of the climate crisis and the urgency with which science tells us we need to act can obscure the fact that the action needed is fundamentally very simple: we need to move our energy sources away from dirty fossil fuels and towards clean and renewable energy. The beauty of House Bill 2020, the Oregon Climate Action Plan, is that it provides the opportunity to achieve both of these goals at the same time, ensuring that we draw down our carbon emissions while investing in the clean energy technologies of the future.

Clean energy is coming to more of America's college and universities.