Report | Environment Oregon

Top Risks of Increased Logging in our Forests

Whether it is towering groves of old-growth or crystal clear rivers winding through tree-covered canyons, Oregon’s forests are really what make Oregon, Oregon. Under pressure from the timber industry, members of Congress want to cut a shortsighted, special deal to aggressively log over a million acres of our publicly owned forestland, called the O&C Lands. This would roll back critical environmental protections, such as the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act, in order to ramp up clear-cuts and destruction.

The scariest part of this new logging proposal is that very few Oregonians know the truth. The timber industry and their allies in Congress are calling this logging “balanced,” but the facts show that this is anything but true.

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

On the heels of Oregon’s largest and most devastating wildfires in over a decade a new report from Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center finds that even as Oregon works to cut carbon pollution and transition to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America. Scientists predict that extreme weather events will become more frequent and severe for future generations, unless we cut the dangerous carbon pollution fueling the problem. Environment Oregon was Angus Duncan, Chair of Oregon's Global Warming Commission; OSU Professor Andreas Schmittner; the Douglas County Global Warming Coalition; and Southern Oregon Climate Action Network for the release of the report.

Report | Environment Oregon Research and Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

After yet another year in which many parts of the country were hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, crippling drought, record floods and severe storms like Hurricane Sandy, a new Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center report finds that weather-related disasters are affecting hundreds of millions of Americans, and documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

America has more than doubled its use of wind power since the beginning of 2008 and we are starting to reap the environmental rewards. In Oregon, wind energy now displaces as much global warming pollution each year as much as is produced by 550,000 cars. To protect the environment, federal and state governments should continue and expand policies that support wind energy.

Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Solar Works for Oregon

Oregon has vast untapped potential for solar energy. Taking advantage of the state's solar energy potential would reduce Oregon's contribution to global warming and protect its environment. More solar power would also create jobs and boost manufacturing in Oreogn. Putting policies in place to accelerate the growth of the solar energy market will allow Oregon to start reaping these benefits immediately.

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