Updates

Clean Water Roundtable - December 17
Join us for our Clean Water Roundtable Discussion

The public comment period for EPA’s proposed “Waters of the U.S.” rule is closed, and now we need to keep the momentum going if we want to protect Oregon's rivers! Join us for a discussion on what's coming up next.

News Release | Environment Oregon

Oregon wind energy could reduce pollution by equivalent of nine coal plants

Portland, OR-- The equivalent of the carbon pollution from nine coal plants could be eliminated in Oregon if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment Oregon. The analysis comes just as Congress considers whether to renew tax credits critical to wind development.

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Report | Environment Oregon Research and Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

Wind power is on the rise across America. The United States generates 24 times more electricity from wind power than we did in 2001, providing clean, fossil fuel-free energy that helps the nation do its part in the fight against global warming.

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News Release | Environment Oregon

Environmental groups deliver 8 millionth comment to clean up power plants

Washington, DC--   As the public comment period on the Clean Power Plan closes today, Environment Oregon joined colleagues across the country to deliver a symbolic “8 millionth” comment supporting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards to reduce carbon pollution from power plants. 

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News Release | Environment Oregon

Oregon Attorney General Defends EPA Action on Climate

On Monday evening, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum joined 13 additional states and the District of Columbia to stand up for new EPA regulations on global warming pollution. The attorneys general jointly filed a brief with the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, defending EPA against an attack launched by Murray Energy Corporation, a coal-mining company.

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News Release | Environment Oregon

Oregon’s rivers see progress due to Clean Water Act Advocates, businesses, students call for more “waterways restored”

OREGON- On the heels of the 42nd anniversary of the Clean Water Act, a new report tells the story of how the bedrock environmental law has helped to restore and protect the Willamette River. Once so polluted that salmon fingerlings placed in the river died within 15 minutes, the Willamette is on its way back to health, thanks in part to enforcement of water quality standards required by the Clean Water Act. Today, after 20 years of effort, the volume of sewage overflows to the river has been cut by 94 percent, allowing Oregonians to once again swim in the Willamette.

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